e3 Civic High School

Academics » Course Selection 2017-2018

Course Selection 2017-2018

Requirement A: HISTORY/SOCIAL SCIENCE

Three years, including one year of world history, cultures and historical geography and one year of U.S. history, or one-half year of U.S. history and one-half year of American Government or civics.

 

World History (2 credits)

Grade 10

In this course, scholars will focus on a global perspective of the world, both of the present and in the past. The course will also ask scholars to engage in an intensive study of self and world cultures, through the lenses of race, class, religion, and gender, while paying special attention to how ideas change over time. While doing so, scholars will be asked to analyze common phenomena on different cultures in an attempt to draw the space closer to one another in an increasingly digital world.  

 

AP World History (2 credits)

Grade 10

The AP World History course focuses on developing scholars’ understanding of world history from approximately 8000 B.C.E. to the present. The course has scholars investigate the content of world history for significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in six historical periods, and develop and use the same thinking skills and methods (analyzing primary and secondary sources, making historical comparisons, chronological reasoning, and argumentation) employed by historians when they study the past. The course also provide themes (interaction between humans and the environment; development and interaction of cultures; state building, expansion, and con ict; creation, expansion, and interaction of economic systems; development and transformation of social structures) that scholars explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places encompassing the major geographical regions of the globe: Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania.

 

U.S. History (2 credits)

Grade 11

This course is the interdisciplinary study of English Language Arts and U.S. History, which will examine the promise, fulfillment, and reimagining of the American Dream. Scholars will trace the foundations of the country, from revolutionaries to immigrants, and try to define what it means to be American. We will analyze not only primary sources of historical records, but also the literature and poetry inspired by historical events.

 

U.S. History Pre AP (2 credits)

Grade 11

This course is broken up into four quarters for two semesters. Honors United States History is designed as a survey course, beginning with the Pre-Columbian discoveries and continuing to current times. This course provides scholars with a framework for studying political, social, economic, and cultural issues and for analyzing the impact these issues have had on American society. As an honors course, scholars should expect a rigorous content level and pace. This course demands greater independence and responsibility and concentrates on the development of higher level thinking skills.

 

U.S. Government & Politics (1 credit)

Grade 12

During the fall semester of Humanities IV, you will learn about the foundations of our country and the unique democratic government system it created. You will understand your roles as citizens of the United States and how to protect the liberties you are afforded by the Constitution. In addition, this course will teach you how the American political and election system work.

 

Economics (1 credit)

Grade 12

In this one-semester course, scholars will learn the basic macroeconomics and microeconomics principles that will help them understand how the economy of the United States works. They will learn how to become financially responsible and prepared for all financial operations that adults have to perform in order to have a stable, healthy financial life. By the conclusion of this course, scholars will understand a variety of economic terms and principles, including but not limited to: Scarcity, Opportunity Cost, Goal Setting, Setting Up and Maintaining a Budget, Financial Operations, Investments, Circular Flow, Resource and Product Markets, Government’s Role, Trade, and Supply/Demand

 

*All scholars who take an AP Course will take the corresponding AP Exam at the end of the term. Financial assistance is available for those who qualify.  Scholars should register with their counselor to get information on financial waivers


 

 


Requirement B: ENGLISH

Four years of college preparatory English that integrates reading of classic and modern literature, frequent and regular writing, and practice listening and speaking

 

 

ENGLISH 1/2 (2 credits)

Grade 9

English 1/2 is the interdisciplinary study of English Language Arts and Civics, the study of our rights and duties as citizens. Humanities is the study of what makes us an individual and what makes us a community. Using the 21st century innovation skills of critical thinking and problem-solving, collaboration across networks, leading by influence, agility and adaptability, initiative and entrepreneurship, effective oral and written communication, accessing and analyzing information, and curiosity and imagination, our scholars will explore what it means to be human. They will closely investigate and interact with complex texts and deepen their skills in writing common-core aligned narrative, information, and argument texts.

 

English 3/4 (2 Credits)

Grade 10

This course emphasizes the critical analysis of complex expository and narrative texts. Each standards-based unit of study interrelates reading, writing, oral communication, and language study. Scholars are provided with multiple opportunities to articulate their own ideas as well as to question, interpret, and evaluate others’ ideas.  E3 Eng 3/4 supports an in depth and independent research-based reading and writing as well as critical analyses of a range of challenging literary and informational texts. The course content focuses on teaching scholars skills and strategies for critical, independent reading and writing of increasingly complex and narrative texts. These texts are approached looking at the perspectives, or lenses, of race, class, religion, and gender. Instruction in each standards-based unit of study interrelates reading, writing, oral communication, and language study. Scholars are provided with multiple opportunities to articulate their own ideas as well as to question, interpret, and evaluate others’ ideas. The goal of instruction is to support scholars in becoming independent, strategic, critical readers, writers, listeners, and speakers who communicate effectively in various forms, for genuine purposes, and to authentic audiences. The course’s overarching yearly theme is international relations.

 

English 5/6 (2 Credits)

Grade 11

In English 5/6, we will focus our learning on the foundation of the 11th grade Common Core English Language Arts standards.  Our curriculum will cover four novels this year, placing a large emphasis on contemporary non-fiction and literature. Additionally, we place a heavy emphasis on writing proficiency. Written expression is a crucial part of communication and critical thinking. For high school scholars, developing strong writing skills not only helps their high school grades but also prepares them for their academic and professional futures.  We aim to make a difference in our community and world through both the written word and incorporating creative deliverables, such as video, photography and art.

English 5/6 Pre-AP (2 credits)

Grade 11

This course provides integrated reading and writing techniques through an American Literary emphasis. Using literature as its focus, the course will dig deeper into literary movements in America from Early American writing, through Romanticism, Postmodernism and Contemporary writing. Scholars will initiate critical thinking, as well as evaluative and interpretive skills necessary for more challenging courses. Grammar, syntax, and rhetoric are clarified on an independent basis through the discussion of essays and other written efforts. Appropriate performance in this class will adequately prepare scholars for 12th grade AP English courses.

 

CSU EXPOSITORY READING & WRITING (2 credits)

Grade 12

During both the fall and spring semesters of Humanities IV, you will enhance your expository reading and writing skills by completing college preparatory ERWC coursework. The Expository Reading and Writing Course (ERWC) coursework was designed to improve the readiness of high school scholars for English competency in college, whether in the CSU, UC, or the California Community College (CCC) systems, and employs a research based effective practices approach for teaching both reading and writing at a deep level. Course assignments, organized into 14 modules and based mainly on non-fiction texts, emphasize the in-depth study of expository, analytical, and argumentative reading and writing.

 

AP ENGLISH LITERATURE (2 credits)

Grade 12

Daily Course (A&B days)

An AP English Literature and Composition course engages scholars in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, scholars deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, scholars consider a work’s structure, style and themes, as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism and tone.

 

*All scholars who take an AP Course will take the corresponding AP Exam at the end of the term. Financial assistance is available for those who qualify.  Scholars should register with their counselor to get information on financial waivers. *

 

 


 

Requirement C: MATHEMATICS

Three years of college preparatory math, including or integrating the topics covered in elementary and advanced algebra and two and three-dimensional geometry. (4 years is recommended)


INTEGRATED MATH 1 READINESS (2 credits)

Grade 9

Daily Course (A&B days)

*non A-G approved course

This course specifically prepares scholars to excel in Integrated Math 1, which they will take in the the following school year.  In this course, scholars will be introduced to solving equations, working with functions, integrating algebra with geometry, and statistical data.

 

 

INTEGRATED MATH 1 (2 credits)

Grade Levels vary by scholar’s individual sequence of Math Coursework

Daily Course (A&B days)

This course establishes the relevance of mathematics by connecting an abstract understanding of Algebra and Geometry with practical implementation and problem-solving. Aligned to the common core standards, mathematics prepares scholars to use linear and quadratic functions to model trends, to draw critical relationships, and to reveal important implications in authentic data. This course is also a comprehensive look at the study of proofs, parallel and perpendicular lines, the coordinate plane, triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, circles, trigonometry, congruence and similarity, surface area, volume and transformations, facilitating scholars to use coordinate geometry and trigonometry to solve design problems.

 

INTEGRATED MATH 2 (2 credits)

Grade Levels vary by scholar’s individual sequence of Math Coursework

Daily Course (A&B days)

This course is an overview of fundamental mathematical skills relating to functions, equations, inequalities, probability, radicals, absolute value, exponents, polynomials, logarithms, complex numbers, the binomial theorem, rational functions, conics and matrices. This course prepares scholars to understand, model and analyze real-world problems by solving, graphing and comparing polynomial, trigonometric and exponential functions. This course also prepares scholars to use probability and trigonometry to draw conclusions and make decisions. Applications of topics will emphasize critical thinking and incorporate the use of technology. Moreover, scholars will be prepared for advanced studies in mathematics.

 

INTEGRATED MATH 3

Grade Levels vary by scholar’s individual sequence of Math Coursework

Daily Course (A&B days)

Integrated Math 3 is designed to further explore the principles introduced in Math 1 and Math 2 in preparation for enrolling in advanced mathematics courses. Scholars will expand their knowledge of linear, exponential, and quadratic functions to polynomial, logarithmic, rational, and trigonometric functions. Scholars will extend their understanding of trigonometry to all triangles and their experiences with data as they solve sophisticated statistical problems. Scholars will experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that draws their ability to make sense of problem situations, and will develop the ability to explore and solve mathematical problems, think critically, and work cooperatively with other scholars and communicate mathematical ideas clearly.

 

STATISTICS (2 credits)

Grade 11, 12

This course introduces topics typical of a college level statistics course, including data collection, descriptive statistics, probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression. This course is a prerequisite for AP Statistics.

 

PRE-CALCULUS (2 credits)

Grade 10, 11, 12       

Prerequisite: Math 3

Daily Course (A&B days)                

This course is designed to prepare scholars to succeed in calculus by extending and drawing on knowledge gained through three years of integrated math in high school. The purpose of this course is to give scholars a deeper understanding of advanced graphical, algebraic and numerical techniques for solving, analyzing, and understanding trigonometry, functions, and multi-variable equations. By the completion of this course, scholars will be able to analyze the properties of functions and appropriately model real-world scenarios. This course continues the natural sequence of math studies from Integrated Mathematics III to establish readiness of all scholars to take Calculus.

 

AP CALCULUS (2 credits)

Grade 11, 12

Daily Course (A&B days)

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus

This course is equivalent to the first semester of a three-semester university calculus sequence. This course specifically prepares scholars to excel on the AP Calculus AB exam, which is offered during the spring semester. In this course, scholars will be introduced to limits, derivatives, integrals, and applications of single-variable calculus. Additional support will be provided to scholars who plan to independently study for the AP Calculus BC exam.

 

*All scholars who take an AP Course will take the corresponding AP Exam at the end of the term. Financial assistance is available for those who qualify.  Scholars should register with their counselor to get information on financial waivers. *


 

 

 

Requirement D: LABORATORY SCIENCE

Three years of laboratory science providing fundamental knowledge in at least two of the three disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics (4 years is recommended)


MEDICAL BIOLOGY (2 credits)

Grade 9

Medical Biology is a UC approved Biology course with an emphasis on the clinical aspects of Biology. Meeting the same state standards as a regular Biology course, Medical Biology is the entry-level science for the Medical Pathway. Scholars enroll in this class at the 9th grade level. Every unit and lab assignment in the Medical Biology curriculum relates to health, the human condition, and the health care professions. Medical Biology is an experimental science, with the focus on molecular, cellular, and body system interactions. This reflects the job market, where thousands of new jobs are being created in biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, bioinformatics, medicine, and related molecular biology fields. In addition, citizens in the new millennium will face an increasing number of science related issues such as stem cell research, global warming, cloning, and gene manipulation. This highly contextualized method meets all California State Standards and is an approved “D” Biology course as required by the UC and CSU universities.

 

BIOTECHNOLOGY (2 credits)

Grade 10

Even though we may not know it, our world and        lives are made convenient by biotechnology. We live in a scientific world, from enjoying seedless watermelons, bananas, GMO produce, fish and preserved food we eat to cancer research, stem cell research, and genetic screening. Our job in biotech is to analyze these issues from varying points of view and understand their importance and dangers. We will have hands on marine biotechnology experience and get to observe first hand the science behind our lives, from microbiology to organismal biology, and the fundamentals to proceed forward in a scientific career. The course will give scholars lab and experiment knowledge applicable to biotechnological practices. Scholars will learn how to identify accurately types of cells, how to culture organisms, the central dogma with a DNA extraction lab, biotech effects on ocean water quality, how to argue an ethical point of view scientifically, hands on in the field marine biotechnology knowledge, and a general sense of how biology and chemistry are involved in everyday life. This course will prepare you for the next step in biology reinforcing your fundamentals.

 

BIOMEDICAL CHEMISTRY (2 credits)

Grade 10

Chemistry (Medicine and Health) is a rigorous college-preparatory science course designed to collectively mentor scholars interested in exploring a career in health and medicine. This course is based on the California State Standards for Chemistry, which were developed so that every scholar would have access to a uniform quality and quantity of information in science. Scholars will be expected to pursue mastery of the standards with problem-solving, critical thinking, and deductive reasoning skills.

 

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY HONORS (2 credits)

Grade 12

Prerequisite: Biomedical Chemistry

This course is designed to be 12th grade, advanced study of the human body for scholars with an interest in pursuing a career in a health-related field. Topics include anatomical structures, physiological systems, and body functions. Scholars will acquire skills used in the classification of data, experience in oral and written communication of data, and skills in drawing logical inferences and predicting outcomes. Scholars will apply the principle of physiology to human health and well-being and evaluate the applications and career implications of physiology and anatomy principles.

 

 

 

 

 

 

AP CHEMISTRY (2 credits)

Grade 11, 12

Daily Course (A&B days)

This AP Chemistry course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first year of college. For most scholars, the course enables them to undertake, as a freshman, second year work in the chemistry sequence at their institution or to register in courses in other fields where general chemistry is a prerequisite. This course is structured around the six big ideas articulated in the AP Chemistry curriculum framework provided by the College Board. A special emphasis will be placed on the seven science practices, which capture important aspects of the work that scientists engage in, with learning objectives that combine content with inquiry and reasoning skills.

 

*All scholars who take an AP Course will take the corresponding AP Exam at the end of the term. Financial assistance is available for those who qualify.  Scholars should register with their counselor to get information on financial waivers. *

 

 

Advanced Physics

This course introduces all the topics typically covered in a two-semester algebra-based college physics course and a three-semester calculus-based college physics course (for science and engineering majors). This course includes weekly laboratory demonstrations by scholars. Pre-Requisite: Proficiency with trigonometry and algebra (Integrated Math III). Concurrent enrollment in pre-calculus or calculus is recommended.

 

AP Biology

This course will provide an introduction to Biology curriculum through a series of lectures, labs, selected reading and class projects.  The courses is meant to serve as a general overview of biological concepts including evolution, genetics, heredity, cell biology, anatomy and physiology as well to serve as a primer for scholars interested in taking AP Biology or Anatomy and Physiology.  In addition, statistical analysis of data and modeling of concepts will be expected. A significant amount of studying must be completed at home to allow time for discussion, labs, and inquiry during class time. The new AP Biology curriculum encompasses 4 ‘Big ideas’, with Essential Knowledge and Process Skills that support each one.

 

*All scholars who take an AP Course will take the corresponding AP Exam at the end of the term. Financial assistance is available for those who qualify.  Scholars should register with their counselor to get information on financial waivers. *

 


Requirement E: LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH

Two years of the same language other than English or equivalent to the second level of high school instruction (Three years is recommended)


 

MANDARIN 1/2 (2 credits)

Grade 9

This is an introductory course for non-Chinese speaking scholars who until now have had little in-depth exposure to the intricacies of Mandarin Chinese language and Chinese culture. The main objective of Mandarin 1 is to develop a strong foundation in the Mandarin Chinese language in listening, speaking, reading and writing. The listening and speaking skills in high-frequency common communicative settings will be developed through problem-based and project-based learning. Scholars will also be able to accurately write and depict Chinese characters, and effectively develop their phonetic understand of Pinyin. In addition, Chinese culture will be incorporated throughout the curriculum to help scholars build multicultural proficiency.

 

MANDARIN 3/4 (2 credits)

Grade 10

This is a continuation of Chinese 1/2 C. The course is designed to prepare scholars to meet the second language requirement for high school graduation and college. It is also open to scholars who wish to pursue their personal interests in Chinese language and culture. The class is conducted in a learner-centered environment where Pinyin, characters, word usage, sentence patterns, and grammar are taught. Scholars will improve the understanding of the connection between the language and culture.

 

MANDARIN 5/6 (2 credits)

Grade 11

Mandarin III builds on language skills developed in Mandarin I and II. The purpose of this yearlong course is to further develop scholars’ language accuracy in both formal and informal contexts. The course will more extensively review grammar and sentence structure and will give scholars the opportunity to practice appropriate use of idiomatic expressions, reading, and writing skills. It will also build vocabulary, expand reading comprehension through studies of classic Chinese literature, and encourage extensive conversation in Chinese. To promote cultural enrichment and greater understanding of Chinese tradition, the course will also introduce the history and concepts of Chinese philosophy.

 

MANDARIN 7/8 (2 credits)

Grade 12

In Mandarin IV, scholars develop more advanced languages skills as they practice listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the target language. Building on skills obtained in the previous three years, scholars continue to expand on their ability to express themselves in a variety of real-life conversations on topics such as traditional holidays in China, the changing of China, healthy lifestyles, travel, equal rights for women, environmental protection, money management, Chinese history, job interviews, and living in China as a foreigner. Scholars hone their ability to use complex syntax and grammar structures acquired from last year and focus on the ability to express their thoughts in an authentic and polite manner while speaking and writing. As they practice speaking, they learn to become more adept at spontaneous speaking. In addition to the textbook, songs, poems, movies, Chinese newspaper articles, blogs, and guest speakers are woven into the curriculum to incorporate cultural topics and authentic sources. Scholars are assessed on each unit in a variety of ways, such as quizzes, tests, compositions, role play, dialogues and projects.

 

SPANISH 1/2 (2 credits)

Spanish 1/2 is an introductory course based on the 4 essential elements to learn and communicate in a foreign language: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The acquisition of Spanish will also occur through cultural exposure as seen through art, realia, pronunciation, activities, videos, and readings. The class will encourage learning through individual instruction, group collaboration, hands on activities, and spoken dialogue. It is the philosophy of the facilitator that anyone can build their confidence to communicate in a foreign language and you can learn through your mistakes. To learn Spanish is to open the door to an exciting and fun world of adventure!

 

SPANISH 3/4 (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10

This course is designed for scholars who have taken Spanish 1/2 and wish to continue their Spanish studies. Non-native speaking scholars work together to develop and enhance integrated skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish. Instruction will emphasize listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in preparation for advanced work. Scholars will be able to express themselves at a more advanced level in present and past tenses. Additional emphasis will be focused on reading comprehension in the target language.

 

 

SPANISH 5/6 (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11

Spanish 5/6 uses 21st century skills to improve the level of Spanish communication. It will use today’s world languages curriculum and instructions based on the following categories: (1) Communication, (2) Cultures, (3) Comparisons, (4) Communities. Native Spanish speakers will learn to articulate and improve their functionality in the language; whereas, non native speakers will increase their mastery and confidence in the foreign language. Scholars will go beyond the learning of isolated words and memorization of limited phrases. Scholars will also continue to practice the elements needed to communicate effectively in a foreign language (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). The class will encourage learning through individual instruction, group collaboration, hands on activities, and spoken dialogue.

 

 

 

 

Requirement F: VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS

One year chosen from dance, music, theater or the visual arts

 

MADRIGALS (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Previous Choir Experience

The Madrigal Choir is made up of elite singers from e3’s scholar body. Previous vocal music experience as well as a yearlong commitment is required to be a member of this ensemble. Scholars will perform at several community events throughout the school year including school showcases, KUSI’s “Songs of the Holiday Season”, the Padres Choir Night, Disneyland workshops and California Music Educator’s Association festivals.

  

ADVANCED DRAMA (2 credits)

Grade 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Drama 1; LF Recommendation

This course is for scholars who have passed Drama I and would like to continue their work in the dramatic arts. Scholars will perform in two showcases (Musical Theater and Classical Theater) as well as present a portfolio in one of three areas (Acting, Directing and Technical Theater) for exhibition at the end of the year.

 

Choir (2 Credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

Learn the fundamentals of healthy vocal production while experiencing the joy of ensemble singing in two-, three- and four-part harmony. No experience necessary. e3 scholars participating in Choir are invited to participate in the San Diego Public Library Singers, a new singing chorus designed to serve both the school and the community. Explore the rich cultural heritage of choral singing from the Renaissance through the Baroque, Classical, Romantic periods, up to modern pop and jazz.

 

DRAMA I (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

This course is for scholars interested in the performing arts. Experience is not necessary, but a willingness to perform is! Each participant works at their own level without comparison to fellow scholars. Throughout the semester, scholars will learn the basics of improvisation and acting as well as character development, script writing, theatrical games, scholar skits and direction of showcases. No prior experience necessary.

 

Latin Dance (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

Latin American Dance and Culture Latin American Culture and Dance is an introductory course.  In addition to learning selected Latin American dance styles (mostly focused in the afro-Caribbean and its influence), the course will cover instruction on other elements that influence dance such as culture, history, musical interpretation, and dance etiquette.  Styles of dance within the Latin American genre may include the following: salsa, merengue, cha cha cha, bachata, cumbia, tango, milonga etc.  Although the course will follow the California State Standards previous knowledge or experience in dance is not required.  

 

SHOW CHOIR (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

In this course scholars sing, dance and compete as part of e3’s award winning, advanced show choir, “Premiere.” Scholars perform a variety of modern and and popular repertoire while creating performances that are second to none. No prior experience necessary.

 

INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL ARTS (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

An introduction to art theory, techniques and mediums including beginning practices in drawing, painting, pastels and three dimensional design; also with a strong focus on art appreciation scholars will learn the historical aspects of the art world; building and understanding of art history elements, art work and the artists who created them. Through hands on experience and the creative process, all scholars will be introduced to new art mediums and practices with formal instruction and class demonstrations. No prior experience necessary.

 

DIGITAL MEDIA ARTS 1/2 (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

DMA 1 is designed to introduce graphic design as an art form and visual communication between creator and viewer. Through the use of color, type, form and marketing research scholars will learn all basic and intermediate tools and techniques that the Adobe Illustrator program has to offer. A strong focus on product development, logo development, photo enhancement, and marketing and advertising layouts, learning both the artistic and commercial side of the graphic design industry. Each scholar will build an understanding of 2D & 3D Design, visual placement and color theory through guided instruction and creative problem solving. Each project will be concluded with a class discussion and critique. DMA 2 is the second sequence in developing knowledge of the Adobe CC Software dedicated to the artistic and commercial connection it plays in the design, marketing and art world. Scholars will develop strong skills in pre-production and post production commercial design which involves and not limited to introduction of digital photography, Adobe Photoshop and digital photography editing. This course builds off individualistic ideas, process and design; however, it strengthens prior knowledge of Adobe Illustrator skills and foundation learned in Digital Media Art #1. Adobe Illustrator is also continuously utilized and focused on building skill sets not learned in Digital Media Art #1. Scholars will have created a breadth of digital work between both courses that can be utilized in applications for college level art portfolios.

 

Digital Media Arts Advanced (2 credits)

Grade 10, 11, 12

In this course scholars expand on their previous photography and Photoshop knowledge with more complex projects, eventually branching out into other skills like basic animation, vector drawing, and layout design in Adobe Illustrator and InDesign.

Prerequisite: DMA I

 

VIDEO STORYTELLING (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

During the course of the year, scholars will engage in a variety of activities designed to increase their knowledge of video production. This class will ask scholars to express themselves through researching, writing and creating media projects. Hands-on, real-world activities will require scholars to be creative, responsible and professional. Scholars will consistently use critical thinking skills and a good work ethic to achieve an advanced level of media literacy. Video Production enhances the knowledge and skills taught in traditional English courses, focusing on those aspects of communication applicable to all types of video based media.

 

PHOTOVOICE (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

This course is a participatory photography methodology that asks scholars to represent their community or point of view through photography, critical discussion, narrative and expository writing, conducting research and taking action. The framework is intended to give insight into how the storyteller conceptualizes his or her own circumstances and his or her hopes for the future. This course leads scholars through the writing and visual process of exploring identity and the community. Photovoice attempts to bring all perspectives, backgrounds, and ethnicities into civic dialogue. In this course, scholars will engage in deep and meaningful exploration about race and discrimination, and other compelling topics while learning to use photography, digital storytelling and various writing styles to advocate for social change. Scholars will build norms for respect and engage in deep and meaningful exploration as they strengthen their technical and media literacy skills. Working collectively, scholars will combine their skills to offer a creative method for engaging in community issues then advocating for solutions that will make a difference.


 

Requirement G: COLLEGE PREPARATORY ELECTIVE

One year chosen from the “a-f” courses beyond those used to satisfy the requirements above, or courses that have been approved solely in the elective area.

 


AP COMPUTER SCIENCE (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

Computer Science A emphasizes object-oriented programming methodology with an emphasis on problem solving and algorithm development and is meant to be the equivalent of a first-semester course in computer science. It also includes the study of data structures and abstraction.

 

 

MADRIGALS (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Previous Choir Experience

The Madrigal Choir is made up of elite singers from e3’s scholar body. Previous vocal music experience as well as a yearlong commitment is required to be a member of this ensemble. Scholars will perform at several community events throughout the school year including school showcases, KUSI’s “Songs of the Holiday Season”, the Padres Choir Night, Disneyland workshops and California Music Educator’s Association festivals.

 

ECOLOGY (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

Ecology is the primary specialized discipline of life science that studies the relationships between organisms and their environment. This course provides a background in the fundamental principles of ecological science. Scholars will acquire ecological literacy about how the natural world works and develop an understanding of how scientific methods are used to construct ecological knowledge. This ecology course is designed to expose scholars to the complexity of interactions in the natural world through readings, videos, applied activities, field studies, and laboratory work. Scholars will communicate their understandings regularly in journals and lab/field reports. In addition, scholars will take a unit test at the completion of each unit in the course and a cumulative Final Exam at the end of the course.

 


 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES

Two years are required for gradation

 

PE I (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

This course will integrate health and nutrition science issues relevant to the modern-day teenage society. Scholars will strengthen civic leadership talents by providing solutions to teenage health issues through problem-based, project-based learning. Scholars will present their findings to the public following the completion of their projects. Scholars will also perform daily challenging physical fitness activities, which develop self-esteem, internal motivation, and leadership skills necessary for a future leader.

 

PE II (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

This course will integrate health and nutrition science issues relevant to the modern-day teenage society. Scholars will strengthen civic leadership talents by providing solutions to teenage health issues through problem-based, project-based learning. Scholars will present their findings to the public following the completion of their projects. Scholars will also perform daily challenging physical fitness activities, which develop self-esteem, internal motivation, and leadership skills necessary for a future leader.

 

DANCE (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

In this course, scholars learn and explore dance routines including modern dance and hip-hop. Scholars perform at community events. No prior experience necessary.

 

LATIN DANCE (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

Latin American Culture and Dance is an introductory course. In addition to learning selected latin american dance styles (mostly focused in the afro-caribbean and its influence), the course will cover instruction on other elements that influence dance such as culture, history, musical interpretation, and dance etiquette. Styles of dance within the latin american genre may include the following: salsa, merengue, cha cha cha, bachata, cumbia, tango, milonga etc. Although the course will follow the California State Standards previous knowledge or experience in dance is not required.

 

INTRAMURAL SPORTS --EBLOCK (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

In this course, scholars improve their collaboration, team-building, and advanced strategies in athletic games while being educated on the importance of health, fitness, and wellness. While many sports and recreational activities will be included, scholars will choose between two main sports: flag football or soccer.
 

YOGA --EBLOCK (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

Do you panic during exams and stress during finals? Do you struggle with focusing in class, or sitting in a chair all day? Do you want to learn more about health and fitness but don’t know where to start? Yoga might be the eBlock class for you!Yoga is a practice of self-study that uses uses breathing to connect the body and mind. In this course, scholars will learn (by doing!) about yoga poses, breathing exercises, holistic health, and ancient philosophy. Scholars will begin practicing self-awareness through movement and breath. Scholars will also learn more about their individual personality and body types, including which foods, activities, and habits that will help them find a balanced lifestyle. Finally, scholars will explore the ethics of mindful living to decide how to best treat themselves and each other in a forever-changing world. These lessons are meant to help scholars cultivate a lifelong practice for personal health and wellness that starts with the easiest and most natural thing - breathing. Yoga is open to all scholars who feel the class will serve their interests and needs. No prior experience, flexibility, strength, or body types are required… only an open-mind!

 

 

EBLOCK COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

URBAN AGRICULTURE (2 credits)

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Scholars will learn about gardening and farming in an urban (city) setting. We will be doing a combination of hands-on activities, including painting garden signs, planting seeds, harvesting food, composting, eating salad and cooking healthy recipes. The focus of the class will be on gaining an appreciation for nutrition and growing food in a manner that does not harm our environment. Many days we will be outside, walking to the garden and getting our hands dirty. Be prepared to stay active and eat great food.

 

FINANCIAL LITERACY (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

Learn the skills necessary to manage a checking account, learn the principles of saving, create and maintain a personal budget, make investments, learn how to manage debt and learn the principles of credit.

 

YEARBOOK (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

This is an elective two-semester course designed to develop basic skills in design, photography, editing, journalism, managing and marketing. Scholars are responsible for taking digital photos, conducting interviews, managing clerical operations, making announcements, maintaining signage, and composing, designing, and editing all elements of text, graphic art, and digital photography layouts that will appear in the yearbook. This course requires scholars to be organized, motivated, and possess strong reading and writing skills upon entering the class, as well as be available outside of regular class hours to attend school activities and meet deadlines.

 

ENTREPRENEURSHIP (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

Scholars learn the basics of business and write a business plan of their own. Scholars also work as a team to run a business selling coffee.

 

INTRAMURAL SPORTS (2 credits)

*PE Credit

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

In this course, scholars improve their collaboration, team-building, and advanced strategies in athletic games while being educated on the importance of health, fitness, and wellness. While many sports and recreational activities will be included, scholars will choose between two main sports: flag football or soccer. 

 

 

FORENSIC SCIENCE (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

Criminal cases, even cases that have been cold for decades, are being brought to life because of the advancements in science. This course will show how science can be used in the field of criminal justice to solve murder, abuse, kidnappings, and any crime case available. The course will offer an understanding of DNA sequencing, mitochondrial DNA matches, anatomy, as well as demonstrate methods used to actually solve cases such as DNA extraction, synthetic blood tests, and odontology. Forensic Science will give you knowledge and experience to question if you would enjoy it as a professional career.

 

CIVIC LEADERSHIP (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

This course is an introduction to the issues, challenges, and opportunities of civic life in the early 21st century. It provides a foundation for understanding the roles of public scholarship, community engagement, and social action in democratic citizenship and global stewardship. We will examine key research and theory underlying recent thinking about community engagement, as well as explore strategies for responsible social and environmental change. What does successful service- and community-based learning look like? Why do we do it? What positive difference can we really hope to make? Who benefits? Though our focus is global, we’ll pay particular attention to the development, present challenges, and future hopes of San Diego, a paradigm 21st century city. We will also meet many of the people--civic leaders, city staff, researchers, and community members--who make San Diego work.

 

TECHNICAL THEATER (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

Opportunities exist in this class for you to be involved in many areas of the technical production process: set design, costume design, lighting, hair and makeup design, and graphic design. Work begins with the technical course and continues at home, as well as in after school rehearsals as the performance time draws near. Performances are a large part of the course and participation is expected. In addition, commitment to extra after school rehearsals will also be mandatory. You are expected to work every day toward greater efficiency and a professional final product. It is recommended that you concurrently enroll in Intro to Visual Arts, Photovoice, DMA 1, or DMA Advanced to expand on the skills you develop in Technical Theater.

 

PLAY PRODUCTION/MUSICAL THEATER (2 credits)

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Play Production is a two-semester course that meets weekly during Wednesday’s eBlock, as well as during scheduled after school rehearsals. In this class, scholars work together to put on performances of a full-length musical during the spring semester. Opportunities exist in this class for scholars to be involved in all areas of the theatrical process: acting, singing and dancing. Maintaining a 2.0 GPA as well as committing to after school rehearsals and performances is mandatory for this class.

  

COMMUNITY CLASSROOM (2 credits)

Grade 10, 11, 12

Community classroom offers scholars the opportunity to participate in either a Career Exploration or Career Target Internship. Career Exploratory Internships are for scholars who are unsure about their career interest. This type of internship focuses on soft skills and scholars may rotate through various departments to gain an understanding of career options available to them. Career Target Internships are for scholars who are interested in a particular career path. Scholars often work on projects and build skill sets that are commonly found in a particular career.

 

STUDY SKILLS (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Eligible Scholar Support Plan

This elective course is designed to help scholars acquire strategies for academic and work environments. Each strategy supports the commitment to scholar success during and after the completion of high school. Study Skills is divided into four focus areas: 1. Teaching strategies to help scholars become more efficient and effective learners; 2. Transition planning; 3. Goal setting; and 4. Assistance with homework, instruction, and assignments from core and elective classes. In an effort to foster scholars’ independence, self-awareness, and self-advocacy, learning facilitators and scholars will plan and collaborate frequently.

 

STRUCTURED ENGLISH IMMERSION (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

Structured English Immersion (SEI) is an English Language Development (ELD) class that is designed for scholars who are in the process of learning English (classified as Beginner through Intermediate EL levels). SEI focuses on achieving English proficiency through Literacy and Language skills (Reading, Writing, Listening, and Speaking) that are rigorously presented through grade level content and aligned with California ELD and ELA (English Language Arts) Standards. The SEI curriculum is designed for scholarly engagement in projects and presentations that facilitate achieving English proficiency.

 

NUTRITION (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

Introductory culinary skills are developed progressively by preparing the food of many world cuisines. The fundamentals of nutrition and how dietary choices impact daily performance and long-term wellness are explored.

 

ROBOTICS (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

Scholars will be introduced to the fundamentals of robotics and engineering and will learn to use the engineering design process to creatively solve problems in teams. We learn to build robotic structures, construct electronic circuits, and write computer code in ways that can help us to overcome complex challenges.

 

PEER ASSISTANT LEADERSHIP (PALs) (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

The Peer Assistance and Leadership course recognizes the potential of youth as a resource and catalyst for change in other youth. Through peer-to-peer mentoring, PAL scholars work to build resiliency and self-confidence in their e3 peers as well as in younger scholars within partnering schools in the downtown San Diego community. The PAL peer helping program philosophy identifies an innate capacity for social understanding, personal well-being, and community participation within every scholar. Scholars will be instructed in different activities for building self-awareness, group dynamics, and communication skills throughout the first six weeks of the course. These skills will then be used in the mentoring of younger scholars in the areas of understanding behaviors, decision making, and problem solving throughout the remainder of the semester.

 

FINANCIAL LITERACY (2 credits)

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

Learn the skills necessary to manage a checking account, learn the principles of saving, create and maintain a personal budget, make investments, learn how to manage debt and learn the principles of credit.

 

 

SCHOLAR LEARNING COACH/TUTOR (2 credits)

Grade 11, 12

Scholar Learning Coaches will assist other scholars with specific learning gaps in courses as needed. Specific areas of growth will be identified and the Scholar Learning Coach will provide interventions for support in these areas.

 

INTRODUCTION TO PYTHON (2 credits)

UCSD Extension Computer Programming

Grade 9, 10, 11, 12

UCSD Extension Credit: 3 units in Computer Science & Engineering

Python is a relatively easy programming language to learn. Python statements can be interpreted using various operating systems. This course was developed with the first time programmer in-mind. Scholars will learn rules and syntax applicable to a modern programming language, learn how to understand and develop algorithms, gain an understanding of general programming constructs including variables, expressions, functions, branching, looping statements and data storage. Scholars will also design, write and debug simple computer programs using Python. This course serves as a good foundation for scholars looking to further their training in C, C/C++ and C# programming languages. 

 

YOGA (2 Credits)

*PE Credit

Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

Do you panic during exams and stress during finals? Do you struggle with focusing in class, or sitting in a chair all day? Do you want to learn more about health and fitness but don’t know where to start? Yoga might be the eBlock class for you!Yoga is a practice of self-study that uses uses breathing to connect the body and mind. In this course, scholars will learn (by doing!) about yoga poses, breathing exercises, holistic health, and ancient philosophy. Scholars will begin practicing self-awareness through movement and breath. Scholars will also learn more about their individual personality and body types, including which foods, activities, and habits that will help them find a balanced lifestyle. Finally, scholars will explore the ethics of mindful living to decide how to best treat themselves and each other in a forever-changing world. These lessons are meant to help scholars cultivate a lifelong practice for personal health and wellness that starts with the easiest and most natural thing - breathing. Yoga is open to all scholars who feel the class will serve their interests and needs. No prior experience, flexibility, strength, or body types are required… only an open-mind!

 

 

 

UCSD COLLEGE COURSES

 

Human Nutrition

A survey of our understanding of the basic chemistry and biology of human nutrition; discussions of all aspects of food: nutritional value, diet, nutritional diseases, public health, and public policy. 

 

Psychology 101

This course is a survey of the concepts, principles and terminology of psychology as a science. Emphasis is placed on introducing scholars to the diverse areas that make up the field of psychology, preparing scholars for further study in the behavioral sciences and providing scholars with greater insight into human behavior.  This course is designed for scholars planning to take advanced courses in the Social and Behavioral Sciences and/ or scholars majoring in Psychology.

 

Sociology 101

This community college course is an introductory study of the basic concepts, theoretical approaches, and methods of sociology. Topics include the scientific study of social interaction, structure, and organization; groups; socialization and the self; social stratification; culture and diversity; social change; and global dynamics. Topics and examples emphasize present-day America, including cross-cultural and multicultural analysis.

Available to juniors and seniors Recommended 2.5 and above.

 

Communications 103

This community college course is an introduction to speech making. Emphasis is placed on the skills required to organize and deliver a variety of types of speeches. Scholars give several speeches with and without visual aids. This course is designed for Communication Studies majors and for anyone interested in honing their speech skills.  

Available to juniors and seniors Recommended 2.5 and ab